Dedicated to preventing and reducing juvenile delinquency by providing innovative programs through which adolescents can become responsible and productive.

Frequently Asked Questions

Common Questions About Our Therapeutic Christian Boarding School

How much does the program cost?

The specific cost of the program for a child varies depending on your family’s level of need and estimated length of stay at Caribbean Mountain Academy. However, your Intake Coordinator can walk you through the various scenarios available based on your unique needs.

Is financial assistance available?

We’re continually seeking private funds to help offset program costs for families in financial need.  Please check with your Intake Coordinator to see if any funds are currently available and to explore other financial resources, such as private insurance.

What about transportation arrangements?

Each family is responsible for their child’s transportation to and from the Santiago Airport in the Dominican Republic.(Cost of flight will vary depending on your starting location.) We recommend that a parent, guardian, or close family friend accompany your child to ensure their safe arrival. Caribbean Mountain Academy staff will meet you and your child at the airport and transport your son or daughter to Caribbean Mountain Academy to begin their experience.

How do you handle medical needs or concerns that arise?

We have a certified EMT who is our medical officer that lives on campus to handle non-serious medical issues.   Any medical emergencies will be handled at the local medical clinic located in the town of Jarabacoa, which is less than 10 minutes away.

Payment for all doctor visits/ medical treatments is the responsibility of the parents. Your Therapist will communicate with you about these arrangements. Any non-emergency procedures will be arranged in advance with you by your Therapist.

What kind of meals will my child eat?

Your child will receive nutritious, well-balanced meals and snacks during their stay at Caribbean Mountain Academy. Contact us for a sample menu to give you an idea of the types of foods we serve.

How safe is the area?

We have a successful history working with students in the Dominican Republic. The area we are in, Jarabacoa, is a non-resort community, therefore, it is not prone to the crime of a major metropolitan area. In addition, our campus is gated and we have security guards employed for added peace of mind. Finally, students are always accompanied by staff to provide appropriate supervision and safety.

What if my child runs away from the program?

There are numerous safeguards in place to deter a child from running away, including continuous staff supervision and the gated security of the campus. Add to that the unfamiliarity of the culture/language and the lack of access to public transportation (Jarabacoa is outside of public transportation lines), and it is unlikely that a child will attempt to flee the program. However, if your child were to run from the program, we would take that situation extremely seriously. Our staff would all be informed so we could immediately begin searching for the child. We also have a network of local ministries who could be called upon to assist us in such an emergency. Finally, we have a long-standing relationship with local businesses that are familiar with our students and would immediately notify us if they saw one of them unaccompanied by a staff member.

Who are you accredited through?

Crosswinds has a private Christian boarding school accredited by Christian Schools International – (CSI), a gold standard accreditation program that is based on both a dedication to measuring the mission of the school and the process for continuous school improvement. Our Certificate of Accreditation through CSI. Licensed teachers facilitate core classes using the self-paced, on-line curriculum called Apex.  This allows students to earn credits at their own pace helping them to catch up, keep up, and get ahead.

Who does oversight on your campus?

  • Christian Schools International does site-visits to review CMA practices.
  • Members of both the United States Embassy and CONANI, a Dominican organization that protects the rights of children and adolescents,visit our CMA campus unannounced at least twice a year on separate occasions to review our program.

 

What advice would a parent of a child in your current program give a family considering placement at CMA?

Understand that this will be a tough journey. It will require a lot of work, participation, an open mind, and will require parents to cooperate and trust the program design and leadership of the Administration. Ask a lot of questions about the program that would apply personally to your child’s issues, concerns and needs. Do not hesitate or be afraid to be forthcoming with your questions and continue to ask the questions that you need answers to in order to feel comfortable with leaving your child. Do not force your child to attend any program! If your child believes he or she needs help, needs a life change, is in trouble with no way out, sees himself or herself making choices that could eventually negatively change the course of their life,  encourage him or her to go online and spend time looking at the program, the CMA property and listening to audio’s. Your child will need to see and hear what goes on in order to get a better sense of what they can expect and to help them connect in some way. The fear of the unknown may determine your child’s greatest resistance. Parents get comfortable first with sending your child. Your display of assurance will be a reassuring sign to them.

To be open, honest and trust.

To do it to reclaim peace and calm in your home. Be involved and consider yourself an important and valued part of the team. It’s not a perfect program but I never worried about our child’s mental, emotional or physical well being. Keep the level book in front of you and make sure you feel comfortable that your child is truly growing and progressing, not simply moving through the program.

Run to it, don’t walk. The family needs to realize this process is for the entire family. Parent/ family participation is a must, consistently. Don’t abandon your children here and expect CMA to fix them. The entire family needs to do work.